Scott Hall

Biography of Scott Hall

Scott Hall has long been reviled as one of the most unsavory characters in the world of professional wrestling. His blatant disregard for authority and the law have time and again overshadowed his limitless potential and charisma. While Hall’s in ring talent and microphone charm have never been at question, his inability to deal with out of the ring demons have reduced the superstar and former champion into a mere bit player on wrestling’s biggest stages.

Hall, who has spent the last seven years wrestling under his real name as a member of the New World Order (first formed in 1996), has had numerous brushes with the law during his seventeen year wrestling career. These brushes with the law, which began in 1989, have occurred despite the swaggering Floridian’s position as one of the most recognizable figures in wrestling. Despite his unquestioned ability, Hall may only be remembered for never encountering a law he couldn’t break.

Despite his bad boy reputation, Hall has received numerous second chances in the wrestling industry. His latest rebirth came in February, when World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) signed Hall, along with cohorts Kevin Nash and Hulk Hogan to reform their New World Order angle, which had last appeared in 1999. The angle became available to the WWE following their purchase of World Championship Wrestling (WCW), which occurred in 2001.

Hall began his second stint in the WWE by appearing at the organization’s “No Way Out” pay-per-view in February alongside Nash and Hogan. He then faced Stone Cold Steve Austin at Wrestlemania XVIII at the Toronto Skydome. Although he lost to Austin at Wrestlemania, the fans and the WWE’s reaction to Hall’s return appeared positive. However, these positive reactions did not stop Hall from slipping back into his old habits, according to the WWE.

According to the WWE, several wrestlers complained about Hall’s attitude towards the company beginning in early April. At the same time, WWE sources state that Hall began binge-drinking, showing up to as many as four April shows under the influence. The final straw came for the WWE at this past weekend’s “Insurrextion” pay-per-view in London, England.

According to the WWE, Hall showed up at the show under the influence after two days of drinking, at one point falling asleep while the pay-per-view was occurring. Hall then showed up at WWE Raw two nights later under the influence, although he sobered up by the time the show began. In the Monday night main event, Hall teamed with N.W.O. cohorts X-Pac and the Big Show to defeat Austin, Bradshaw, and Ric Flair.

With Hall appearing at two consecutive shows intoxicated and with growing anti-Hall sentiment perforating the dressing room of the WWE, the organization felt it had no choice but to release the troubled star following the show. The official announcement of Hall’s release was made on Tuesday on the WWE’s website.

Their statement concerning the release of Hall was as follows: “World Wrestling Entertainment senior vice president for talent relations Jim Ross announced today that WWE and Scott Hall have mutually agreed to end their contractual relationship. WWE wishes Hall the best of luck in his future endeavors.”

While the WWE’s version of events has been unchallenged thus far, according to a source close to Hall, it could not be further from the truth. Since the release of their statement, the WWE has refused to comment about the Hall situation, stating instead that they will move forward toward their next pay-per-view, which is scheduled for May 19th. Hall has also not released a statement, as sources state that he has retreated to his Chuluota, Florida home for the time being.

According to the source close to Hall, the wrestler who began his WWE career as Razor Ramon is considering filing suit against the WWE for wrongful termination. It is for that reason that the source that spoke to sportstalkcleveland.com did so on the condition of complete anonymity. According to the source, Hall stated to him that the split between he and the WWE was anything but mutual.

“Following Monday Night Raw, they flat out told Scott he was fired,” stated our source. “Scott told me that he wasn’t drunk at the London pay-per-view or before that Raw. If you look at the tape of the pay-per-view, he doesn’t walk funny or act like he has had a lot to drink. The fact that he fell asleep is inexcusable, however it isn’t grounds to be fired. Besides, Scott wasn’t even scheduled to wrestle that night, so why should they even care if he is sleeping backstage.”

Hall told the source we spoke with that he did indulge in alcohol consumption prior to both the event in London and the Raw telecast, however that he was not drunk at prior to either event. At the Insurrextion pay-per-view, Hall was scheduled only to accompany fellow N.W.O. member X-Pac to ringside. X-Pac pinned Bradshaw in the evening’s third match with interference help from Hall, who appeared to be sober during the match. Hall was never scheduled to be a wrestling part of the card at the pay-per-view.

The source we spoke with would not comment on the specific grounds of Hall’s possible wrongful termination suit. The source did tell sportstalkcleveland.com however that Hall believes his bad boy reputation led to a rush in judgment bye the WWE and also states that because of his numerous second chances and previous arrests, they were less than fair in their decision to terminate him.

“Because of everything that has happened with him out of the ring, they were quicker to be less lenient with him than anyone else,” the source stated. “They are too quick to be afraid that Scott is going to slip back into getting into trouble every other day. They have no regard for the fact that he loves this business and he loves entertaining people. He doesn’t do anything that anyone else doesn’t do, they are just tougher on Scott."

Hall has been arrested sixteen times in the span of thirteen months for everything from drunk and disorderly conduct to assault. His span of arrests has ranged from something everyone would do (taking a swing at a nightclub patron who insulted him) to something no one would do (kicking in the door of a cab while intoxicated). This span has also included its share of bizarre moments, including Hall threatening police officers during his arrest at his own children’s custody hearing.

Lost amid his string of arrests, the wrestler known appropriately as “the bad guy,” has enjoyed some outstanding in ring success. Hall captured his first title with tag team partner Curt Henning, as the pair won the AWA tag team titles in 1986. Five years later, Hall enjoyed his first taste of individual gold, when he grabbed WWC Caribbean Heavyweight in 1991. In 1993, he defeated Rick Martell to earn the four WWE Intercontinental reigns.

He would lose his first Intercontinental title reign in April of 1994, only to earn the belt back in August of that year. In 1995, Hall defeated Bill Dundee to earn the USWA Unified World Heavyweight Championship. He then followed up that success by earning his third WWF Intercontinental with a defeat of Jeff Jarrett. After losing the title to Jarrett three days later, he capped 1995 with his fourth and final WWF Intercontinental title reign, earning the strap with a defeat of Dean Douglas.

After sliding to WCW in the fall of 1996, Hall enjoyed success with partner and lifelong friend Nash, as the pair earned the WCW tag team championships in 1996 and held them for nearly a year. They then added two more title reigns to their collection, grabbing the belts in January and February of 1998. After the N.W.O. split in half in the spring of 1998, Hall teamed with the Big Show in July to earn his third tag team title reign of that year.

In February of 1999, Hall enjoyed his first individual success in four years as he defeated Roddy Piper to earn the WCW United States Heavyweight Championship. After that championship was vacated, Hall won the title back in a four corners match in November of 1999. After vacating that championship once again, Hall earned his final singles title by grabbing the WCW Television title on November 21, 1999. Eight days later, Hall turned Riddick Bowe and dropped the belt into the trashcan.

On December 13, Hall reunited with Nash to give the Outsiders their fourth WCW Tag team title reign, as the pair defeated Bret Hart and Bill Goldberg. The tag team title would turn out to be Hall’s final taste of gold, capping his title numbers at nine individual championship reigns and six tag team championship reigns. According to the source we spoke with, these numbers alone should give the WWE a reason to look past Hall’s problems and instead look at his great ability.

“How many wrestlers can say they have fifteen title reigns?” our source asked. “Again, I submit and he has said this to me many times, he isn’t doing something that everyone else doesn’t do. Vince (McMahon) doesn’t have a whole lot of great wrestlers in his company right now and he should have held on to Scott. Who cares if he goes out and drinks occasionally, he can flat perform. That is what Vince needs, people who can perform.”

The WWE’s ratings have been steadily declining for the last two months, thanks to a virtual stagnation in the company’s storylines. The only upward movement in the WWE’s ratings has largely come via the N.W.O.’s angles, which are now hurt with the departure of Hall. According to the source we spoke with, without one of the central figures of the black and white army, the WWE will be at a virtual loss to create N.W.O. storylines.

“He was very central to everything that they were doing,” stated our source. “Heck, he was in the ring when they turned the Big Show and Flair into N.W.O. members. What are they going to do without him; he was a pretty key link in everything that they were doing. With Vince’s ratings going south, he really needed the N.W.O. to continue to do well. Now that Scott is gone, he can kiss that good bye.”

Hall began his wrestling career under his given name wrestling in both Japan and Puerto Rico. In 1988, he arrived for his first stint in WCW as the Diamond Stud under the direction of Diamond Dallas Page. Four years later, he moved to the WWE as Razor Ramon, a wise guy wrestler, who would be his most popular persona. His defining moment however came in 1996, when he appeared on the WCW Nitro set on Memorial Day, predicting a “hostile takeover.”

Hall was soon followed by Nash and the character turn of a then squeaky clean Hogan, which vaulted the WCW ahead of the WWE in the television ratings for nearly two years. The source tells sportstalkcleveland.com that Hall has done enough in the wrestling industry to deserve the benefit of the doubt. Given the major impact he played in the resurgence of WCW, Hall should have been allowed to continue, to help turn around the sagging WWE.

“With his one appearance, he made WCW a winning organization. If they would have given him the benefit of the doubt and developed the N.W.O. storyline a little bit more, Scott could have really helped their ratings. The biggest problem with Vince is he has no loyalty or imagination. Scott is really upset about the release, because he feels he had a lot to offer to Vince’s organization. Apparently, Vince didn’t see it that way.”

Hall may or may not have been fully intoxicated when he arrived at the pay-per-view. He may or may not have been full intoxicated when he arrived at Raw. Whether or not he was is unfortunately irrelevant because of Hall’s passed actions. For Hall, it is now the mere appearance of impropriety that causes him harm, even when he doesn’t mean for harm to be caused.

Hall is without a doubt one of the most talented and charismatic wrestlers ever to grace the squared circle. He is also one of the most troubled human beings to have stridden through the usually murky ranks of professional wrestling. With Hall, he has either been the best or the worst that the profession has to offer. How ironic is it then that in what may be his final act on the wrestling stage, that his dismissal is shrouded in gray with no clear black or white answer.

 

Scott Hall is one of the greatest pro wrestlers aka sports entertainer's of all time.

-Hall formed a tag team with Marty Jannetty called the Starship Express, and was given the ring name "Coyote.”
- In the AWA, Hall quickly formed a tag team with Curt Henning. On January 18, 1986, the duo defeated Steve Regal and Jim Garvin for the AWA World Tag Team title in Albuquerque, NM.
- As a singles wrestler, Hall was managed by Diamond Dallas Page.
- When the AWA folded in 1990, Hall wrestled briefly for Tennessee's CWA, before joining WCW in 1991. He was still managed by Page, and formed a stable that included Vinnie Vegas (Kevin Nash) and Scotty Flamingo (Raven).
- On March 3, 1991, Hall defeated Miguelito Perez for the WWC (World Wrestling Council) Caribbean title in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico.
- Although he earned PPV wins over Tom Zenk and Tommy Rich, he never got over with the fans, and in 1992, Hall signed with the WWF, a move that would drastically change his career.
- Hall became Razor Ramon, a gimmick invented by Vince McMahon.
- Bobby Heenan became Razor’s manager, in a stable with WWF champion Ric Flair.
- Ramon defeated Bob Backlund at Wrestlemania IX.
- In the summer of 1993, Razor turned babyface following a defeat to the 1-2-3 Kid (X-Pac). Ironically when Ramon turned face, he adopted the nickname “The Bad Guy.”
- Ramon defeated Ted DiBiase at Summerslam ’93, which turned out to be DiBiase’s last match in the United States.
- On September 27, 1993, Ramon won a battle royal in New Haven, CT to claim the vacated Intercontinental title.
- Ramon successfully defended the IC title against Irwin R. Schyster (Mike Rotunda) at the 1994 Royal Rumble.
- In one of the greatest WWF matches of all time, Ramon defeated Shawn Michaels in a ladder match that headlined Wrestlemania X.
- Diesel (Nash) pinned Ramon for the IC title in April 1994. Ramon regained the title at Summerslam ’94 in Chicago, IL.
- Despite dropping the IC title to Jeff Jarrett at Wrestlemania XI, Ramon regained the title on May 19, 1995, in Montreal.
- In the spring of 1995, Ramon captured the USWA title.
- On October 22, 1995, Ramon pinned Dean (Shane) Douglas in Winnipeg to capture his fourth IC title.
- In early 1996, Ramon feuded with the ever strange Goldust.
- McMahon suspended Ramon when his drug and alcohol addictions were becoming more apparent. Ramon's match with Goldust scheduled for Wrestlemania was also canceled.
- Eric Bischoff offered Hall a huge contract to jump to WCW, an offer McMahon refused to match with Hall in the condition he was in.
- On May 27, 1996, Hall made his "Nitro" debut, and announced, "we're taking over.” A reference to the soon to be assembled New World Order.
- Hall and Nash completed the formation of the New World Order at the Bash at the Beach ’96, when “Hollywood” Hogan turned heel.
- The team of Hall and Nash became known as “The Outsiders.” They recruited Ted DiBiase, The Giant, Buff Bagwell, Syxx, and of course, Eric Bischoff to the NWO.
- At the '96 Halloween Havoc, Hall and Nash won the WCW World Tag Team title for the first time, from Harlem Heat. They held the belts for over a year, but lost many title matches to the Steiners. Every time they'd lose, Bischoff would "use his power" to allow them to keep the belts anyway.
- At World War III ’97, Hall won the three ring sixty-man battle royal to earn a WCW title shot, however, Hogan took his spot again Sting at Superbrawl.
- Soon after, Hall took some time off to rehab again. At this time, Nash broke away from the original NWO to form his own faction, the Wolfpac.
- Hall returned at Slamboree to turn on Nash, and remain loyal to NWO "Hollywood."
- Hall helped Nash win the WCW title at Starrcade '98 when he used a cattle prod to shock Goldberg, allowing Nash to gain the pin fall and title.
- At the 1999 Superbrawl, Hall pinned Roddy Piper for the United States title.
- On the November 8, 1999 episode of "Nitro," Hall captured the U.S. title in a four-way ladder match.
- Hall defeated Booker T at the 1999 Mayhem in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
- Hall was involved in the main event at Superbrawl 2000, pitting Sid, Jarrett, and Himself in a three way match for the WCW title. In the match, Hall suffered a neck injury.
- On March 27, 2000, Hall underwent neck surgery.
- WCW released Hall on October 17, 2000, dumping his hefty annual $1.625 million salary.
- ECW booked Hall for their November 10th and 11th shows in New York.
- Hall was booked by New Japan Pro Wrestling in March 2001.
- On May 5, 2001, Hall and Dusty Rhodes defeated Larry Zbyszko and Steve Lawler on a Turnbuckle Championship Wrestling (TCW) show in Dothan, Alabama.
- After the show, Hall returned to New Japan.
- On January 18, 2002, Hall signed a two year contract with the WWF.
- At Backlash '02 in Kansas City, MO, Hall defeated Bradshaw.
- A day after the May 6, 2002 edition of "Raw," Hall was released by WWE.

 

Updates:

11th May 2002

The following is from an article on sportstalkcleveland.com

According to the reporter, Hall may be suing WWE for wrongful termination. For now take it as a rumor. Here is a 3 paragraph snippet from the column.

According to the source close to Hall, the wrestler who began his WWE career as Razor Ramon is considering filing suit against the WWE for wrongful termination. It is for that reason that the source that spoke to sportstalkcleveland.com did so on the condition of complete anonymity. According to the source, Hall stated to him that the split between he and the WWE was anything but mutual.

“Following Monday Night Raw, they flat out told Scott he was fired,” stated our source. “Scott told me that he wasn’t drunk at the London pay-per-view or before that Raw. If you look at the tape of the pay-per-view, he doesn’t walk funny or act like he has had a lot to drink. The fact that he fell asleep is inexcusable, however it isn’t grounds to be fired. Besides, Scott wasn’t even scheduled to wrestle that night, so why should they even care if he is sleeping backstage.”

Hall told the source we spoke with that he did indulge in alcohol consumption prior to both the event in London and the Raw telecast, however that he was not drunk at prior to either event. At the Insurrextion pay-per-view, Hall was scheduled only to accompany fellow N.W.O. member X-Pac to ringside. X-Pac pinned Bradshaw in the evening’s third match with interference help from Hall, who appeared to be sober during the match. Hall was never scheduled to be a wrestling part of the card at the pay-per-view.

May 2002: . SCOTT HALL FIRED BY WWF

Scott Hall was released from the World Wrestling Federation following Monday nights Raw telecast. Hall was fired from the company after problems on last weeks European tour.

Hall was only with the company four three to four months. His time was marked as troubled in the first few weeks but he adjusted quickly.

No reports on any specific incidents that prompted his release..

Jan 2002: Scott Hall is back in the WWF as part of the NWO

September 2001: Scott Hall and Kevin Nash meet with Vince McMahon regarding a possible return to the WWF.

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